Where the Jobs Are Now and in the Future?

TOM HUDSON: Exactly where are the jobs now, and where will they be in the
future? Suzanne Pratt takes a closer look.

SUZANNE PRATT, NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT CORRESPONDENT: This is the New
York office of ad agency Arnold Worldwide. A quick look around suggests it
might be a cool place to work. Clients are household names in a variety of
industries, from Lee Jeans to everyone’s favorite candy.

And guess what? CEO Andrew Benett says Arnold has been on a hiring
spree, adding 300 new U.S. jobs in the last two years. That’s a 40 percent
increase in staff. More are coming this year.

ANDREW BENETT, CEO ARNOLD WORLDWIDE: We anticipate to continue to
hire at maybe a similar, maybe slightly slower pace than we’ve been hiring.
But we expect it to continue.

PRATT: Arnold Worldwide is not alone in its hiring. The nation’s
unemployment rate has dropped for five straight months, and economists
predict more companies will be filling up those empty offices this year.

Still, job growth is picking up very slowly, but it is finally
happening in many industries. A recent government study predicts America
will get the most new jobs in health care in the current decade, followed
by business and professional services, and then, surprisingly, in
construction.

Experts say construction payrolls will get built up because so many
jobs were lost during the “Great Recession.” Here’s another surprise,
executive recruiter Dale Winston expects we’ll regain some factory jobs
too.

DALE WINSTON, CHMN. & CEO, AMROP BATTALIA WINSTON: I believe that
there will be jobs in manufacturing. And, you know, they may not be the
traditional jobs, but they’ll be the warehousing jobs.

PRATT: Winston also expects lots of hiring in technology,
particularly digital media, previously a somewhat mysterious field.

WINSTON: More people get it now, so there has been a lot of need for
people with a good understanding and vision.

PRATT: Which brings us back to Arnold CEO Andrew Benett. He says the
firm has 60 open positions, half in tough-to-fill social media.

BENETT: We’re all going after a very similar pool of talent. So,
kind of modern, progressive, talent today, people that are very active and
engaged at a minimum level in social media.

PRATT: To be clear, the U.S. still has a long way to go before the 13
million unemployed Americans find work. But every job helps. Suzanne Pratt, NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT, New York.


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