Issues and Events Surrounding Super Tuesday

TOM HUDSON: Well, Super Tuesday is living up to its name, not just with the stock sell-off, with one out of every five Republican presidential delegates at stake, Mitt Romney has a strong chance to break away from his challengers
and wrap up the Republican presidential nomination. Darren Gersh explains what that could mean for the rest of the
campaign.

DARREN GERSH, NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT CORRESPONDENT: The votes are
still being cast, but the presidential campaign felt more like a face-off
today. Mitt Romney appeared by satellite to speak to a pro-Israel lobbying
group. Touching on the issue that has unnerved the oil markets, Romney
called President Obama’s outreach to Iran “naive.”

MITT ROMNEY (R), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: Hope is not a foreign
policy. The only thing respected by thugs and tyrants is our resolve.

GERSH: The president, appearing before a news conference, hit back
against Romney and other Republicans for what he called their “casual
attitude” to war. And he contrasted that with the decisions he has made to
send men and women into battle.

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: And the impact that has
on their lives, the impact it has on our national security, the impact it
has on our economy. This is not a game. There is nothing casual about it.

GERSH: Get used to this kind of back and forth. Post-Super Tuesday,
Washington analyst Chris Krueger expects the field to narrow to a two-man
race, Romney and Obama.

CHRIS KRUEGER, SENIOR POLICY ANALYST, GUGGENHEIM SECURITIES: Romney
is going to have two things on his side after today. He’s going to have
the delegate math working for him, and he is going to have momentum working
for him. Both of them are needed to secure the nomination; both of them
will be on his side.

GERSH: And that means the topics and tone of the debate will change,
too. Expect less talk in coming months about issues like contraception
that appeal to some core Republican voters, and more talk about the economy
and other issues that appeal to middle class voters.

KRUEGER: “Economic fairness,” “we can’t wait,” “jobless recovery.”
And you’ll start to see the trenches being dug and the rhetoric start to
dial up.

GERSH: For now, though, asked what he would say to Mitt Romney on
this Super Tuesday, the president would only said “good luck.” Darren Gersh, NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT, Washington.

GHARIB: As Darren mentioned, also in the spotlight today, President
Obama giving his first press conference this year. He said diplomatic
solutions are still possible in the Iran conflict, and he also urged
Congress to pass his proposal for homeowners to refinance.


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